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Wing, Samuel Arthur (1863–1880)

A fatal accident occurred at Messrs. D. L. Brown and Co.'s wharf, Short-street, yesterday afternoon, about half-past 4 o'clock, to an apprentice, 17 years of age, named Samuel Wing, belonging to the barque Lanarkshire. The unfortunate youth, along with two others, was engaged in painting the stern of the ship, and was working on a plank suspended by means of ropes at the ship's side, in the usual manner, when the staying suddenly gave way, and he slipped and fell into the river between the ship and the wharf. On the accident being observed, a lifebuoy and a rope were thrown to him, but being unfortunately unable to swim, he failed to catch them. Three or four of the crew then jumped overboard and tried to rescue him, but were unsuccessful. His body was recovered about an hour afterwards, and conveyed to the morgue by the police and captain of the ship. The deceased was a nephew of the late Mrs. Silvester Dingles, naturalist, and a native of Hull, England.

Original publication

Citation details

'Wing, Samuel Arthur (1863–1880)', Obituaries Australia, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, https://oa.anu.edu.au/obituary/wing-samuel-arthur-27460/text34875, accessed 21 September 2021.

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Life Summary [details]

Birth

1863
Yorkshire, England

Death

27 April 1880
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Cause of Death

drowned

Cultural Heritage