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Samuel Raymond (1808–1871)

The Melbourne Argus of the 22nd says: — In our obituary notices we record the death of another old colonist, Mr. Samuel Raymond, eldest son of the late James Raymond, formerly Postmaster General of New South Wales. In March, 1841, the deceased gentleman accompanied Judge Willis to Port Phillip as first deputy sheriff. Subsequently, he held the appointments of chairman of quarter sessions and prothonotary of the Supreme Court of New South Wales, from which latter office he retired on half pay in consequence of ill health. For the last seven or eight years he has resided in Victoria, but in consequence of ill health was unable to assume any prominent position. He was one of the oldest colonial barristers. He married the eldest daughter of Lieut-Colonel Bull, of Castlemaine, and leaves a widow and four children.

Original publication

Additional Resources

Citation details

'Raymond, Samuel (1808–1871)', Obituaries Australia, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, https://oa.anu.edu.au/obituary/raymond-samuel-13950/text24850, accessed 18 June 2024.

© Copyright Obituaries Australia, 2010-2024

Life Summary [details]

Birth

17 May, 1808
Limerick, Ireland

Death

20 June, 1871 (aged 63)
Kew, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Cultural Heritage

Includes subject's nationality; their parents' nationality; the countries in which they spent a significant part of their childhood, and their self-identity.

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