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Kidman, Sackville (1855–1899)

One of the oldest and most highly-respected residents of the Barrier, Mr. Sackville Kidman, died last night, after a brief but very painful illness. Though it had been reported early in the week that he was seriously ill, a change for the better came on Thursday; and the news of his death, involving so great a loss to the community, will come as a great shock to his very numerous friends.

It was on Saturday night last that the illness was felt first. Drs. Horne and Bartley diagnosed inflammation of the bowels, and by Monday it was seen to be so desperate a case that Dr. Bartley was kept in almost constant attendance; and later on Dr. Hamilton was brought up from Adelaide. Yesterday afternoon his condition was so desperate that the medical attendants decided, as a last resource, to perform an operation for the removal of a fungus growth in the stomach. The condition of the patient was then very low; and although the operation in itself was completely successful, the patient continued to sink, and about 11 o'clock was seized with convulsions, which ended in death at midnight.

Mr. Sackville Kidman came to the Barrier long before Broken Hill's wealth was discovered, and was for some time manager of Sturt's Meadows station. After the discovery of silver on the Barrier Mr. Kidman started a butchering business at Silverton in the very early days, giving up his position at Sturt's Meadows. He did not remain in business at Silverton very long, but turned his whole attention to stock dealing, for which his singular knowledge of stock admirably fitted him; and, carrying his enterprise in this connection far into the northernmost parts of Queensland, he achieved an uncommon degree of success. Later on he took up country at Bancannia and at Black Hill, near Silverton. These properties he stocked, and met with such success that he was soon enabled to take up country in Queensland for stock-raising purposes. During the early days of the Barrier he took stock overland from Queensland to Sydney, Adelaide, and Melbourne, and was one of the best-known men on the stock routes.

The present local firm of Kidman Bros. had, before deceased's connection with it, seen many changes. Five or six years ago the business, which was then the leading butchering business of the Barrier, was taken over by the present firm, of which deceased was an active member, and since then, owing largely to the excellent business tact of the deceased partner, it was constantly improved. Deceased was widely acknowledged to be one of the best judges of stock in the colonies, and by all who had dealings with him he is spoken of as a straightforward business man. He also has the credit of having established the now flourishing live-stock trade to the West. Although his brother, Charles Kidman, now in the West, devotes a lot of time to racing matters, it was well known that deceased would at any time sooner walk 20 miles to inspect a mob of cattle or a flock of sheep than attend a race meeting. Besides his own holdings he took an active part in acquiring the several stations in Queensland and South Australia now held by the firm of Kidman Brothers.

Deceased was 44 years of age and leaves a widow and several children.

Original publication

Additional Resources

  • is dangerously ill, Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW), 9 March 1899, p 2
  • funeral, Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW), 13 March 1899, p 2

Citation details

'Kidman, Sackville (1855–1899)', Obituaries Australia, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://oa.anu.edu.au/obituary/kidman-sackville-15216/text26420, accessed 24 September 2014.

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