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Collier, Jenkin (1829–1921)

Jenkin Collier, n.d.

Jenkin Collier, n.d.

from Pastoral Review, 16 September 1921

Jenkin Collier, a colonist of 69 years' standing, and a pioneer railway constructor and pastoralist, died in Melbourne last month at the age of 92 years. Born at Bridgend, Glamorganshire, Wales, in 1829, he came out to Victoria for the gold rush in 1852. Before leaving home he had studied engineering, and had also done some contract work, so not meeting with success on the goldfields, he started railway contracting and building large bridges.

The principal lines he was connected with were the Bendigo-Echuca line in Victoria, and the Deniliquin-Moama and Orange-Molong in New South Wales. For many years he, with the late Sir Thomas Mcllwraith and others, was also a keen supporter of the proposed transcontinental line on the land grant system through western Queensland, but the scheme was eventually turned down. On many occasions the late Mr. Collier visited the Old Country, and as a director from its inception for many years of the Melbourne Tramway and Omnibus Company, was asked by the company to investigate and report upon the cable systems abroad. He also took an active part in the management of the Silverton Tramway Company, and for a number of years was a director, as well as holding a similar office on the Deniliquin-Moama railway and many other boards.

The late Mr. Collier, on the pastoral side, became a director of the Squatting Investment Company, owning Thurulgoona Station, in Queensland, soon after its formation in 1882, and held that position when one of the first bores, if not actually the first, was sunk in Queensland on Thurulgoona. He was also a director of the Rocklands Pastoral Company, owning Rocklands Station, Camooweal, partly in Queensland and partly in the Northern Territory. The company went into liquidation, but was re-established under the style of Rocklands Station Proprietary Limited, of which he was again a director.

In 1887, the late Sir Simon Fraser and Mr. Jenkin Collier with their families, took up the first grazing farms in Queensland, the latter's being called Leichhardt Farms, near Aramac. In 1891, about the first Artesian bore in the district was put down on this property, which has been retained by the Collier family to the present day. Mr. Collier, with other members of the family, was also interested in Telemon Station, on the Flinders, near Hughenden, bought in 1898 from the late J. L. Carrie. It is still held by the family.

Another phase of the late Jenkin Collier's many interests is shown in what is probably the biggest concern of its kind in Australia, the Hoffman Brick and Pottery Works, Melbourne, which he established some 50 years ago, and on the board of which his son, Mr. Herbert Collier, is now chairman.

The late Mr. Collier was endowed with an intimate knowledge of psychology, which essentially fitted him for his many dealings with men, but though strict, he was always just, and in no work that he carried out did he do other than gain the respect and liking of all those under his control. He became a member of the Australian Club, Melbourne, in 1879, and there are now only three or four others alive who joined that year or prior to it. Mr. Collier was also a J.P. for New South Wales and Victoria for many years. He leaves a son and three daughters, his wife having died a little over a year ago.

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'Collier, Jenkin (1829–1921)', Obituaries Australia, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://oa.anu.edu.au/obituary/collier-jenkin-236/text237, accessed 24 October 2017.

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