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Cobcroft, Samuel David (Sam) (1850–1913)

One of the best of the good old stock of Hawkesbury natives passed away on New Year's Day, in the person of Samuel David Cobcroft, late of Wilberforce, and the district mourns sincerely for a man who in every phase of life proved himself one of nature's gentlemen. The late Samuel Cobcroft was one of the most manly and upright fellows it would be possible to meet. To know him was a privilege, and to enjoy his friendship was a thing to be proud of. Quiet and unassuming by nature, never interfering in other people's concerns, and detesting everything in the shape of deceit and scandal, the late Mr Cobcroft was a man of noble character, and one whose straight career and honest policy were a pattern for all men. He was one of the best and most industrious farmers in the Hawkesbury district. His farm on Wilberforce road, where the tall poplar tree grows, was always trim and well-worked, and his methods and system were admired by all his fellow farmers. The people of Wilberforce have lost a good friend, and the whole district has lost one of the type of men that can ill be spared. The late Mr Cobcroft was a lover of clean sport, took considerable interest in cricket, and was always ready to encourage the young folk in healthy and manly exercises. He was born at Colo 62 years ago, and was a son of the late George Cobcroft. He married, about 25 years ago, Miss Louisa Dunston, daughter of the late Benjamin Dunston, of Wilberforce, and with his good wife lived the whole of his married life at Wilberforce. They were married in St. John's Church, and two sons were born to them–Roy, 23 years of age, and Kenneth 18. Mrs Cobcroft is a sister of Messrs George and David Dunston, Mrs S. Stubbs, Miss Maria Dunston, and Miss Lena Dunston, the latter of whom lives with her. About 12 months ago the symptoms of an illness from which the deceased suffered caused anxiety to those near and dear to him. Subsequently he had one or two very serious recurrences of the trouble–an inward complaint–and about three weeks before he died he entered Nurse McGahey's private hospital, Sydney, and underwent an operation. A fortnight afterwards he collapsed and died. The funeral took place on the 2nd January. The body was brought from Sydney in the afternoon train, and was met at Windsor railway station by an immense crowd of people, and a string of vehicles and horsemen nearly half a mile long followed the remains through the town. Messrs R. and W. Turnbull and H. and E. Beecroff, were the mounted pallbearers. As the cortege proceeded to Wilberforce many others joined in the sad procession, and at the Church the numbers were further swelled by the crowd of people waiting there. The funeral was one of the largest ever seen in the district, and was representative of every class of the community. It was a great tribute to the respect and esteem in which the deceased was held, and the memory of good Sam Cobcroft, fragrant of good deeds and charitable actions, will not fade for many a long year.

Original publication

Additional Resources

  • death notice, Windsor and Richmond Gazette (NSW), 11 January 1913, p 4

Citation details

'Cobcroft, Samuel David (Sam) (1850–1913)', Obituaries Australia, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://oa.anu.edu.au/obituary/cobcroft-samuel-david-sam-25061/text33557, accessed 14 October 2019.

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