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Carington, Rupert Clement (1852–1929)

Lord Carrington died at 76, Eaton-square, S.W., yesterday, after a long illness, which became critical in the last few days. He fought in the Zulu War of 1879 and in the South African War, when he commanded the 3rd New South Wales Imperial Bushmen.

Rupert Clement George Carington, fourth Baron Carrington, was born on December 18, 1852, the third son of the second Baron by his second marriage to Charlotte Augusta Annabella, younger daughter of Lord Willoughby de Eresby. His grandfather was Robert Smith, the banker friend of Pitt, who was created Baron Carrington in 1796. (Rupert and his brother Sir William had the surname of Carington confirmed to them by Royal licence dated August 21, 1880). Like his brothers, the late Baron went to Eton, where Mrs de Rosen was his dame and the Rev. F. St John Thackeray his tutor, and in 1871 he was granted a commission in the Grenadier Guards. Five years later he contested one of the Buckinghamshire seats, rendered vacant by the elevation of Disraeli to the peerage. The Liberalism of the family was well known in the county, and his brother Charles, later Lord Lincolnshire, had already sat as Liberal member for High Wycombe. The late Baron, however, did not enter Parliament until 1880, and he was unsuccessful in the General Election of 1885. In the same year Charles was appointed Governor of New South Wales and soon after Rupert also went to that State, and there he married, in 1891, Edith, daughter of Mr John Horsfall, of Widgiewa, New South Wales. During the South African War he commanded the 3rd New South Wales Imperial Bushmen, and with his regiment took part in the operations in the Transvaal, the Orange River Colony, and Cape Colony during 1901 and 1902. He was mentioned in dispatches, received the Queen’s Medal with five clasps, and was appointed D.S.O. Later, he was promoted colonel and in 1905 was appointed C.V.O.

In June of last year Lord Lincolnshire died, without surviving male issue, and his brother Rupert succeeded to the two baronies of Carrington in the peerages of Great Britain and Ireland; the marquessate, earldom and viscounty became extinct. Lord Carrington had been a widower since 1908, but leaves a son, Captain Rupert Carington, who succeeds to the baronies, and a grandson and grand-daughter.

Original publication

  • Times (London), 12 November 1929

Additional Resources

Citation details

'Carington, Rupert Clement (1852–1929)', Obituaries Australia, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://oa.anu.edu.au/obituary/carington-rupert-clement-5503/text24000, accessed 24 January 2019.

© Copyright Obituaries Australia, 2010-2019

Life Summary [details]

Alternative Names
  • Carrington, Rupert Clement
  • Carrington, fourth Baron
Birth

18 December 1852
London, Middlesex, England

Death

13 November 1929
London, Middlesex, England

Cause of Death

heart disease

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